Interdependence in the Office and Greenhouses

    Here’s a blog written by one our interns, Allison Baxter, reflecting on the work being done here at Nourish the Planet: Every day something new is happening. Progress is made, knowledge is gained, and growth is accomplished. Whether it’s in the greenhouses or in the office, this is how it goes at Nourish the Planet. I see it most in my weekly visit to the greenhouses. I walk from the office down the lane in the increasing cold brought by the forecasted snow. Once inside, the greenhouses are warm and welcoming. I’m here to take pictures, not of people, but of plants. Compared to last week’s pictures I see that red romaine and butter head lettuces are growing fast. By the end of the month the system will produce over fifty pounds of lettuce. Nourished by trout and goldfish that live in the nearby raceway, each plant grows side by side in the large aquaponic system. The plants and the fish are neighbors, unaware of their interdependence on the one another. And that is the beauty of aquaponics; in this small greenhouse a micro-ecosystem has been created. By mimicking the natural world a successful and sustainable way to produce food, organic and delicious food, has been created. And in this carefully cultivated system the plants and fish are the fruits of labor and love. Once I’ve taken the necessary pictures in the greenhouses, I walk back. It’s a different scene in the office, instead of plants and data, there are laptops and conference calls. The philosophy we work under is called ecolonomics, a fusion of economy and...

Visit to the State Hatchery

Earlier this month, a group of us went to the Bellevue-Watson Hatchery to take a tour of their operations. The hatchery is one of the Colorado Division of Wildlife facilities located a little north of Fort Collins, CO. They operate two separate facilities: one is a grow-out site and the other is a hatchery. It was a beautiful Colorado early winter day with intense sun and snow on the ground. Steve and Jesse welcomed us and then showed us a movie about the operations of the hatchery. Did you know that most Colorado mountain lakes are stocked for recreational fishing via plane? I didn’t! As they fly over a lake or pond that needs stocking they open a tank that’s located within the plane and the fish drop 50-75 ft into the lake. They say that the stocking survival rates in these ponds are about 95%. Wow! Next we went to see the building where they raise their fish from eggs to fingerlings. The Bellevue Hatchery gets all of their eggs when they’ve “eyed-up.” This means that you are able to see a black dot that will eventually turn into the eye of the fish. In their one hatchery building they had over a million fish from the size of around one centimeter (just hatched) to about 5 centimeters. We learned a lot about their systems, but for us the challenge is how to relate that information to aquaponics. For example, they can use copper sulfate to treat disease, but if we were to do that we would most likely kill not only our plants, but our fish as...

Robots in Agriculture – How Cool!

One of our members of our new Nourish the Planet Membership Community sent me a link recently about a great entrepreneur who has developed robotics for agriculture. This entrepreneur totally embodies what we are trying to do at Nourish the Planet. This little company has used innovative financing, very innovative technology and has obviously gotten some great marketing press. If you find articles like this about any type of entrepreneurial efforts that will “make the planet better” please pass them on to us through our Membership Community so they can reach many like minded people.  Remember our strength it in our united front to Teach the World to Feed Itself. Click Here to read this very cool article. written by Wayne Dorband, Founder and CEO of Nourish The...