Nourish The Planet's Webinar Series

Part of our mission here at Nourish The Planet is education. Part of this education initiative is our bi-weekly FREE webinars on a variation of subjects in the realm of sustainability. Our speakers are a mixture of  knowledgeable leaders, educators, business people, and general difference makers. We bring these individuals to you in an easily accessible form that encourages interaction and involvement. Our webinar next week, July 31st, spotlights a type of business not usually associated with sustainable practices that has been a pioneer and leader in its community! We will be speaking with Uncle Benny’s Building Supply Tuesday, July 31st at 7:00 p.m. MST. The webinar is FREE but you must register at the link below: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/164698096 This webinar will fill up fast so don’t miss out! To learn more about our educational events and to hear past webinars please sign up here! Thanks! NTP...

Intern Profile: Laura Farzim

Today we have Laura Farzim, who is one of our Water Quality Interns. She has brought an immense amount passion and expertise to Nourish The Planet. Here is a little more about her in her own words: My name is Laura. I was born and raised in Iran. I received my under graduate degree in animal science at Moscow State Academy of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnology. Then I Moved to Colorado in 2007. Currently I’m pursuing Master degree in Environmental science and graduating this summer from University of Colorado, Denver. I’ve started as water quality intern at Nourish the Planet about 2 weeks ago and learned a lot about Aquaponics and water quality since then. When did you first become interested in sustainability? First time I heard about the term sustainability in school. As environmental science student you hear about the term sustainable development all the time. A Major human impact on Earth is the overusing natural recourses and we need to preserve natural resources for our future generation with practice of sustainable development. How do you incorporate sustainability into your life? I try to reduce, reuse and recycle as much as I can and encourage my friends to do the same thing. For instance I buy only the amount of products I need instead of buying a large amount of products and wasting it later or instead of using paper towels I use regular washable cloths. What do you want to see change in the world in the next 10 years? I would like to see people using cleaner, renewable source of energy. More people having access to...

Blog Highlights from 7.16.12 to 7.20.12

Take a look at the highlights from Nourish The Planet and around the web this week: Continuing with our America Revealed Video Series Wasting Energy gives us vivid images of our own day-to-day energy loss and really speaks to America’s energy addiction. Congress: Expedite Renewable Energy – Stefanie Penn Spear of EcoWatch makes her plea for a renewable energy bill. Again, a Glacier Downsizes – An ice chunk twice the size of Manhattan broke loose from Petermann Glacier near Greenland. The inaugural blog from our very own Anastassiya Zherdeva, Farmers Markets in Kazakhstan give us a bit of global in site on agriculture and differences between our own agricultural products and methods and those in other countries. Infographic: 56% of US Now in Drought – Worst Since 1950s – June 2012 was quite a month for extreme weather events. Growing Micro Greens and Organic Produce for Restaurants in Portland – Learn about what exactly is a micro-green and meet a chef who has embraced urban farming and local food community. Solar powered ice cream cart – So you can have your ice cream and eat it too! More on Coral Reefs and Resilience or Ruination – Many different views on the state of our world’s reefs. Check back next week and have a happy Friday from everyone here at Nourish The Planet! -Savannah...

Farmers Markets in Kazakhstan

Almaty, Kazakhstan. Coming here to America made me realize how good and delicious vegetables and fruits are from home. My family almost never buys vegetables or fruits from the grocery stores instead we buy them from a woman who has her own little farm. She has a huge variety of vegetables starting with tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes, cabbages, carrots and of course fruits like cherries, strawberries, oranges and peach. Let me tell you that there are so many people back home like her who come to the city every day to sell their harvest. You can see these people almost everywhere around the city.  Usually they are sitting by the little shops or renting a small area at the bazaars. A more unusual place where you can see local farmers is the highway. Over the summer the most popular fruits are watermelons and melons. Driving on the highway to the beach you can see hundreds of farmers hanging out in the shade of the trees with their huge melons and watermelons. The best part of it is the price and of course the taste. Usually during the months of July and August prices vary from 20 to 50 cents per 2 pounds. For me as a person who came to the United States from different country daily eating fresh and organic farm products, even though I’m from a big city, it was not a usual thing to buy fruits and vegetables from the grocery stores. The taste is very different and not in a good way. Also the color and sizes of some products look strange to me. I think...

Headlines 7/18/12

It’s hot.  And dry.  Here in Northern Colorado, we can’t escape the reality of this drought that’s touching more and more of the US.  Many of this week’s headlines are about the impacts of this drought, and I’ll continue to follow this issue going forward. Destroying Nature Unleashes Disease – as we encroach into ecosystems across the globe, natural checks on disease are displaced, disregarded or destroyed, leaving humans vulnerable to novel pathogens.  Fun disease fact: Robins are considered a “super spreader” of West Nile.  Think of that when you’re happy to see the first Robin in spring. New Route for Keystone Pipeline Still Crosses Fragile Areas – Damage to these aquifers would be devastating for Nebraskan communities, and further damage the dwindling freshwater supply in the American West. Water Retention Landscapes in Southern Portugal – The goal is to retain all rainwater on the land, replenish the groundwater, encourage springs to reappear, and reduce soil erosion to near zero, while supplying a community of 300 people with healthy organic produce. Photos of the Drought – These photos focus mainly on the Midwest. Heat Leaves Ranchers a Stark Option, Sell – TORRINGTON, Wyo.  As a relentless drought bakes prairie soil to dust and dries up streams across the country, ranchers struggling to feed their cattle are unloading them by the thousands, a wrenching decision likely to ripple from the Plains to supermarket shelves over the next year. Drought Covers Widest Area Since 1956 – In its monthly drought report, the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., announced that 55 percent of the country was in a moderate to...