Future of Food: Part 2

This is part two in a three part interview series with renown philosopher, environmental activist, and eco feminist Dr. Vandana Shiva. In this series she talks about the safety of biotechnology, the ability of all of us to be able to freely use their own seeds, and grow food in the manner that they...

Future of Food: Part 1

This is part one in a three part interview series with renown philosopher, environmental activist, and eco feminist Dr. Vandana Shiva. In this series she talks about the safety of biotechnology, the ability of all of us to be able to freely use their own seeds, and grow food in the manner that they...

Blog Highlights from 10/8/12 to 10/12/12

Take a look at the highlights from Nourish The Planet and around the web this week: The Mattapan Mobile Farmstand Uses Pedal-Power To Bring the Farmers Market To Your Door – This bike allows farmers to bring produce to you without a huge truck or any carbon emissions! $6 Gas and Why We Can’t Let GM Fail – Shaahin Cheyene of Accelerated Intelligence, Inc. gives you his view of his new Chevy Volt and why electric cars should be our future (they’re already our past). A Bad Harvest, Rising Prices … Isn’t It Time To Change The Way Food Is Done? – Mike Small of The Guardian gives his take on why the way we do food production has got to change. SXSW Eco: Searching for a New Environmentalism – “BBQ, Hipster Honkey-Tonk,” and Environmentalism’s new direction. Paul Ryan vs. Joe Biden: The VP Debate Tackles “Green Pork,” Oil, & Solyndra – Last night’s Vice Presidential debates briefly touched upon America’s energy issues, but still no mention of climate change. Should Belugas Swim Wild and Free? – The Georgia Aquarium has proposed to take 18 wild belugas for the purpose of breeding and display at aquariums around the country. Should this happen? Photos: Seed Diversity: A Global Route To Food Security? – Look at these compelling photos of proponents for seed diversity in their daily lives. Be sure to check back next week and have a happy Friday from everyone here at Nourish The Planet! -Savannah...

Intern Profile: Stephanie Lynn

This week we have Aquaponics Intern Stephanie Lynn. She has been an amazing and dedicated addition to our team! Here is bit about her in her own words: I grew up in Indiana and moved to Colorado in 2007.  My educational background is in agronomy and pharmaceutics from Purdue, and environmental engineering from Colorado State.  I have always enjoyed science and math and I love to apply those principles to the real world.  I also enjoy spending time outdoors observing the world around me. When did you first become interested in sustainability? I became interested in sustainability during one of my plant breeding classes at Purdue.  The professor was from Africa and he often gave real examples of how many people around the world struggle just to be able to eat and drink.  These struggles were the result of environmental, educational, economical, and/or cultural factors. What are the most interesting/important things that you’ve learned since being an intern at Nourish the Planet? I have only been working a couple weeks now, but I have already learned about the dynamic interactions between the plants, aquatic life, and water.  In school I was taught about these interactions, but to be able to actually witness this first-hand is extremely valuable from an educational standpoint. How do you incorporate sustainability into your life? I have always incorporated the three R’s (reduce, reuse, recycle), but recently, I have been getting into growing my own garden.  I really enjoy learning new things and developing new skills. What do you want to see change in the world in the next 10 years? I would like to...

Blog Highlights from 10/1/12 to 10/5/12

Take a look at the highlights from Nourish The Planet and around the web this week: Debating the Facts on ‘Green Energy’ – Andrew C. Revkin gives you the facts and fact check surrounding the presidential candidate’s brief mention of green energy. Intern Profile: Lauren Staley – Meet our newest Fisheries Intern, Lauren Staley! Video: Dramatic Fall in Great Barrier Reef Coral Cover – Scientists are scrambling to decide the best course of action to help the Great Barrier Reef weather multiple sources of environmental stress. UK Scientists Developing Autonomous Flying Honey Bee Robots! – Could this be the solution to the Zombie Bee epidemic? A Tug of War Over Solar Tariffs – The U.S. case against cheap Chinese subsidized solar panels had its final hearing at the International Trade Commission this week. Urban Farming for Cynics – If urban farming isn’t the solution, then what is it? Pesticide Use Proliferating With GMO Crops, Study Warns – The combination of pesticides and GMO seeds have created “superweeds” resistant to both. What does this mean for our health? Why is it So Hard For Pandas to Get Pregnant? – With wild Panda populations decreasing, captive breeding programs may be their best bet. However it certainly isn’t as easy as it looks… Be sure to check back next week and have a happy Friday from everyone here at Nourish The Planet! -Savannah...

Headlines 10.3.12

Here are this week’s headlines – California is voting on Prop 37, a wannabe El Nino, an icon for global warming, superweeds, Inuit tensions, ever increasing obesity, and a brand new dinosaur.  It’s a motley crew this week! Experts See Signs of Weak El Nino –  “We believe that there will be an El Niño, but the strength of it is debatable, and it may be a fairly weak one,” said Huug van den Dool, a meteorologist at the federal government’s Climate Prediction Center.  ‘The bigger the El Niño, the bigger the effect,’ said David Neelin, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic science at the University of California, Los Angeles. ‘This may be El Niño manqué, a borderline El Niño — a wannabe El Niño.’  That is disappointing news for anyone hoping for much relief from the drought that has gripped the United States. Some people thought a wetter winter might be in store across the nation’s midsection when they heard, starting in the spring, that the latest Niña had ended and that El Niño was on its way.” The Battle Over Labeling Genetically Modified Foods –  “Did you know that 88 percent of the corn and 94 percent of the soy grown in the U.S. is genetically modified? ‘The Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act,’ would require that any food containing genetically modified ingredients be clearly labeled. If it passes on Nov. 6, some of America’s most popular food products, from Coca-Cola to Corn Flakes, would have to be marked as “partially produced with genetic engineering” — a phrase that food companies fear could be as damning as...