Sustainable Pest Control Methods For Agriculture And Farming

Controlling pest in the farms is very important because they can damage your crops and reduce production. Some insects and parasites can live in the body of plants and animals feeding on them and causing diseases. They are not only annoying but they can also cause several fatal diseases and deprive the plant and animals of essential nutrients that they need for normal growth. Fortunately, you don’t need to run to your local farm supply store to get a bottle of pesticide containing chemicals anymore for your indoor or backyard garden. You have safer and more eco-friendly methods of pest control available and most of the stuff is available in your kitchen pantry already. There are sustainable ways of getting rid of these insects and parasites, without using harsh chemicals, and some of the easy methods of getting rid of these creepy crawlers include using common household products that you can find around the house. Soapy water: spray plants or animals with soapy water. It will get rid of mites, and aphids.   Beer: Beer is not only for drinking. Your pests like beer too. You can make an effective trap for snail or slugs with beer, and prevent them from eating leaves of your plants.   Garlic: garlic has a strong odor that can repel most common bugs. Placing garlic close to your home garden can repel several harmful insects.   Pepper spray: make a solution with soap water, red chili pepper or black pepper. Spray it on your plants to get rid of spiders.   Nicotine spray: make a solution by taking one cup of dried tobacco...

Sustainable Organic Farming – A Better Way Of Livestock Production

We have heard the old saying that “we are what we eat.” This saying has a great significance because what we eat has a great impact on how we live. It is closely related to our health and environment. In recent years, there has been an increased demand for food that is ethically produced and also sustainable. Along with an increase in the amount of organically grown farm lands around the world in the recent years, the concern for growing animals with organic products and awareness for livestock welfare has also increased. Organic farming has now reached new international standards with 84 countries around the world implementing it. There are many aspects of organic farming that benefits the ecology and environment because organic farming does not input any harmful chemical fertilizers, toxic insecticides or synthetic materials into the plant and soil. It also relies on ecological process such as waste recycling and natural pest control methods. Organic farming can especially outperform the conventional farming methods and benefit the land which has been farmed for a long time and has been going through droughts. The conventional agricultural methods, on the other hand, may degrade the quality of the land and may cause soil erosion, excessive water withdrawal and may cause loss of biodiversity to the land. For many third world countries like Africa and Asia, agriculture is the only way to address the growing poverty, to increase self dependency and to reduce need for foreign aids to support their economy. Even in America, the food grown with organic products can significantly reduce our chances of damaging the environment through insecticides...

Hydroponics – What Is It And How It May Work For You

Many of us have done this as a child. We have clipped a part of a plant and kept it in water hoping that the plant will grow with roots coming out. This works with some plants. You are able to see roots grow from the clipped piece and soon it starts to grow into a complete plant. This is hydroponics, and we have done this without knowing that it is a part of agriculture. The term hydroponics derived from two Greek words, “Hydros,” which mean water, and “Ponos,” meaning work. It can often be confused with fish farming or gardening, but the term closely relates to agriculture and scientific researches, rather than gardening or fishing. Hydroponic farming can be a great way to address shortage of food and the increasing demand of food around the world as the population keeps on growing and the resources does not.  The land available for agriculture is decreasing as farm lands are continuously being used for developing other sectors and industries around the world. Hydroponic can especially benefit the third world nations where land is scarce and overpopulated. If you would like to have a kitchen garden in your house, but have no space in your backyard, hydroponics could be the right thing for you to grow your own fresh vegetables.   What is Hydroponic agriculture? Hydroponic is a part of agriculture where plants are grown in a solution or liquid with nutrients. This is usually done in water with fertilizers in it for plants to grow, and it does not require any other medium such as soil, sand, rocks, gravel, etc. This...

Headlines 10/10/12

Hi All!  Here are the headlines for this week.  We have an interview with Lester Brown, the milk drought, world hunger, urban farming in Hong Kong, drought news and more. Food is the New Oil, and Land is the New Gold – video interview with Lester Brown and an accompanying article. Milk Cow Culling Accelerates as Prices Jump –  “U.S. milk production is headed for the biggest contraction in 12 years as a drought-fueled surge in feed costs drives more cows to slaughter.  Output will drop 0.5 percent to 198.9 billion pounds (90.2 million metric tons) in 2013 as the herd shrinks to an eight- year low, the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates.” One in Eight Going Hungry –  “One out of every eight people in the world is chronically undernourished, the United Nations’ food agencies said on Tuesday, and aid groups warned that rising food prices could reverse gains in the fight against hunger.” Fearing Tainted Food, Hong Kong Turns to Urban Mini-Farms –  “As millions of Hong Kong consumers grow increasingly worried about the purity and safety of the fruits, vegetables, meats and processed foods coming in from mainland China, more of them are striking out on their own by tending tiny plots on rooftops, on balconies and in far-flung, untouched corners of highly urbanized Hong Kong.” Drought Leaves Cracks in Way of Life –  “Lost amid the withered crops, dehydrated cattle and depleted ponds that have come to symbolize the country’s most widespread drought in decades has been the toll on families whose livelihoods depend on farming.” Global Food Prices on the Rise –  “Global prices...

Blog Highlights from 10/1/12 to 10/5/12

Take a look at the highlights from Nourish The Planet and around the web this week: Debating the Facts on ‘Green Energy’ – Andrew C. Revkin gives you the facts and fact check surrounding the presidential candidate’s brief mention of green energy. Intern Profile: Lauren Staley – Meet our newest Fisheries Intern, Lauren Staley! Video: Dramatic Fall in Great Barrier Reef Coral Cover – Scientists are scrambling to decide the best course of action to help the Great Barrier Reef weather multiple sources of environmental stress. UK Scientists Developing Autonomous Flying Honey Bee Robots! – Could this be the solution to the Zombie Bee epidemic? A Tug of War Over Solar Tariffs – The U.S. case against cheap Chinese subsidized solar panels had its final hearing at the International Trade Commission this week. Urban Farming for Cynics – If urban farming isn’t the solution, then what is it? Pesticide Use Proliferating With GMO Crops, Study Warns – The combination of pesticides and GMO seeds have created “superweeds” resistant to both. What does this mean for our health? Why is it So Hard For Pandas to Get Pregnant? – With wild Panda populations decreasing, captive breeding programs may be their best bet. However it certainly isn’t as easy as it looks… Be sure to check back next week and have a happy Friday from everyone here at Nourish The Planet! -Savannah...