Headlines 6/13/2012

http://www.businessinsider.com/overfishing-decline-of-oceans-2012-6 “…For perspective, in 1950, the total catch of fish in the ocean was at 18.5 million metric tons. Just half a century later that number spiked to 73.5 million metric tons, an increase of nearly 400 percent. Since then, as many as 90 percent of the ocean’s large fish have been fished out, according to the World Wildlife Foundation…”  Here at Nourish the Planet, we’ve created sustainable, scalable, shrimp growing systems.  We know the state our oceans are in and we’re working hard to find solutions. http://www.businessinsider.com/environmental-collapse-rio-conference-2012-6 I wonder how many times these numbers have to be published, talked about, and reported on before we start to make real changes in the way we live on this planet? http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/2012/04/flex-fuel-humans/ Great article – it’s neat to see how the numbers behind how and what we eat work.  BUT – what frustrates me about these kinds of articles is that the authors inevitably ignore grassfed, pastured meats.  Why?  Meat can be sustainable, and grazers can heal and improve land and soil.  Let’s start talking about those facts alongside the facts about unsustainable factory farmed meat. http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/12/fire-and-warming-different-forecasts-for-tropics-and-temperate-zones/?ref=science Here in Northern Colorado, we can all see the High Park Fire as it continues to burn.  All those who have lost loved ones, homes and property are in our thoughts. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rep-kirsten-gillibrand/the-farm-bill-should-prot_b_1574909.html “…For every dollar that’s invested into the SNAP program, we get $1.71 back in return. This money pays the salaries of grocery clerks as well as the truckers who haul the food and produce across the country. In addition, the USDA estimates that 16 cents goes back to the farmer who grows the produce....

Urban Foraging Finds Fans Among City Residents, Home Chefs and Restauranteurs

A new movement is sweeping the nation as urbanites are visiting local parks, abandoned fields, alleys and sidewalk cracks searching for their next meal. This guerilla campaign, known as urban foraging, is gaining ground as how-to tours are popping up across metropolitan areas in places like New York City, Washington DC, San Francisco, Seattle and urban cities across Oregon. While some scoff at the idea of visiting a local park and plucking goodies such as weeds, mushrooms and greens for their nighttime meal, many are jumping on the bandwagon in an effort to increase sustainability and decrease the costs of their grocery store visit. According to an article from the Baltimore Sun, some noted chefs are even hiring professional foragers to find high-end wild ingredients. The article noted that on a recent urban forager how-to tour, locals found a “large bear’s head tooth mushroom, which can fetch up to $25 per pound at gourmet markets.” However, the point of urban foraging isn’t for the high-end chefs, but the everyday urban resident interested in preserving what is right outside of our doorsteps. One Portland, Oregon forager is doing just this. According to a blog post from treehugger.com, Becky Lerner also known as Wild Girl is only eating what she can find in and around her city. She was quoted in the article as having said, “because we lost most of our ancestral knowledge when our forefathers destroyed indigenous cultures, modern-day foragers are tasked with salvaging what scraps of information we have left. It is essential that we work together as a community to assemble the pieces.” But many ask what...

Younger Generations Embrace Urban Farming

From Vancouver to Los Angeles, younger generations are hearing the call to arms or rather the call to swap stilettos and suits for muck boots and overalls — uniting in a movement to farm within the limits of their city. A woman, Marcy Winograd, was quoted in a Santa Monica Daily Press article as having explained the reasoning behind her urban farm campaign. She said in the article, “our house isn’t big, but the front yard is large. It seemed like it would be a waste not to use it for food production and greening the environment.” There are a number of reasons why waves of urbanites are picking up the pitchfork, and according to an August 2010 article in the Smithsonian magazine the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization found that, “large parts of the developing world are facing shortages of water and arable land,” and this may be a large part of why people are taking matters into their own hands for the greater good of sustainable food production for themselves and others. According to an article on BCBusiness, typical candidates for urban farming are “urban residents who are intellectually or emotionally connected to food and want to get back into primary production,” said Andrew Riseman in the article. Even New York City has jumped on the bandwagon with an urban farm known as Riverpark Farm, which is a 15,000 square-foot farm “amidst the towering skyscrapers and bursting New York City traffic,” according to YourOliveBranch.org. With a slew of information available to better understand urban farming (including a website a whole arsenal of books, articles and blogs), a...